7 Reasons Why No One Is Moving To Ohio

Ohio is a state in the Midwest region of the United States, with a population of about 11.8 million people. It is known for its diverse landscape, rich history, and industrial economy. However, Ohio is also facing some serious challenges that make it less attractive for people to move to or stay in. Here are seven reasons why no one is moving to Ohio:

1. High Taxes

Ohio has one of the highest tax burdens in the country, ranking 7th among the 50 states in terms of state and local taxes as a percentage of income. Ohioans pay an average of 10.7% of their income in taxes, compared to the national average of 9.9%. This includes income tax, sales tax, property tax, and other taxes. Ohio’s income tax system is also complex and progressive, with nine tax brackets ranging from 0% to 4.797%.

2. Poor Economy

Ohio’s economy has been struggling for decades, as it lost many manufacturing jobs to automation, outsourcing, and competition from other states and countries. Ohio’s GDP growth rate was only 1.4% in 2019, below the national average of 2.3%. Ohio’s unemployment rate was 5.5% in November 2020, higher than the national average of 6.7%. Ohio’s median household income was $58,642 in 2019, lower than the national average of $65,712.

3. Bad Weather

Ohio has a continental climate, with hot and humid summers and cold and snowy winters. Ohio experiences four distinct seasons, but they are often unpredictable and extreme. Ohioans have to deal with tornadoes, thunderstorms, floods, blizzards, and ice storms throughout the year. Ohio’s average annual temperature is 50.7°F, which is lower than the national average of 52.7°F. Ohio’s average annual precipitation is 39.1 inches, which is higher than the national average of 30.2 inches.

4. Low Quality of Life

Ohio ranks low in many indicators of quality of life, such as health, education, environment, and safety. Ohio ranks 40th among the 50 states in terms of overall health, according to the United Health Foundation. Ohio has high rates of obesity, smoking, diabetes, cancer, and infant mortality. Ohio ranks 31st among the 50 states in terms of education, according to the U.S. News & World Report. Ohio has low scores in student achievement, college readiness, and graduation rates. Ohio ranks 41st among the 50 states in terms of environment, according to the U.S. News & World Report. Ohio has poor air and water quality, high levels of pollution, and limited access to natural resources. Ohio ranks 36th among the 50 states in terms of safety, according to the U.S. News & World Report. Ohio has high rates of violent crime, property crime, and incarceration.

5. Lack of Diversity

Ohio is a predominantly white state, with 81.9% of its population identifying as white alone, compared to the national average of 76.3%. Ohio has a low percentage of racial and ethnic minorities, such as African Americans (13.1%), Hispanics (4.1%), Asians (2.5%), and Native Americans (0.2%). Ohio also has a low percentage of foreign-born residents, with only 4.6% of its population born outside the U.S., compared to the national average of 13.7%. Ohio’s lack of diversity may limit its cultural, social, and economic opportunities and perspectives.

6. Boring Lifestyle

Ohio is often considered a boring state, with not much to offer in terms of entertainment, recreation, and culture. Ohio has few major attractions, such as amusement parks, museums, theaters, or sports teams. Ohio’s largest city, Columbus, ranks 32nd among the 50 most populous U.S. cities in terms of fun, according to WalletHub. Ohio’s other major cities, such as Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Toledo, rank even lower. Ohio’s rural areas are also dull and isolated, with little to do or see.

7. Negative Reputation

Ohio has a negative reputation among many Americans, who view it as a backward, boring, and depressing state. Ohio is often the butt of jokes, stereotypes, and insults, especially from its neighboring states. Ohio is also associated with political corruption, racial tension, and social problems. Ohio’s image is not helped by its frequent involvement in controversial and divisive national issues, such as presidential elections, abortion rights, and gun control.

Conclusion

Ohio is a state that has many challenges and drawbacks that make it unappealing for people to move to or stay in. Ohio has high taxes, poor economy, bad weather, low quality of life, lack of diversity, boring lifestyle, and negative reputation. These factors may explain why Ohio’s population growth rate is only 0.6%, below the national average of 6.3%. Ohio may need to make some significant changes and improvements to attract and retain more people in the future.

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