Discover the 5 Poorest Neighborhoods in Prince William County, Virginia

Prince William County, situated in the affluent state of Virginia, stands out as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States. As of 2021, the county boasted a median household income of $118,117. Nonetheless, within its boundaries, economic prosperity is not evenly distributed.

According to data sourced from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey spanning 2017 to 2021, some neighborhoods within the county face significantly higher poverty rates and lower incomes. Here are five of the county’s most economically challenged neighborhoods:

1. Yorkshire

Yorkshire, a census-designated place (CDP) nestled in the eastern region of the county near Manassas, is home to a population of 7,897. The poverty rate in this area stands at 19.2%, nearly three times higher than the county average of 6.9%.

The median household income in Yorkshire is $58,750, roughly half of the county median. The majority of its residents identify as Hispanic or Latino (54.4%), followed by white (25.3%), and black or African American (13.8%).

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2. Sudley

Sudley, another CDP located in the eastern part of the county adjacent to Yorkshire, has a population of 17,216 and a poverty rate of 14.4%, more than double the county’s average. The median household income in Sudley is $74,167, approximately 37% lower than the county median.

The racial and ethnic composition of Sudley mirrors that of Yorkshire, with Hispanic or Latino (47.9%), white (28.3%), and black or African American (15.5%) being the predominant groups.

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3. Marumsco

Marumsco, situated in the southeastern part of the county along the Potomac River, boasts a population of 38,894. It grapples with a poverty rate of 12%, nearly twice as high as the county average.

The median household income in Marumsco is $75,833, about 36% lower than the county median. Marumsco is predominantly composed of Hispanic or Latino residents (54%), followed by white (20%), and black or African American (18%).

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4. Dale City

Dale City is a sizable CDP located in the southern part of the county, housing a population of 73,384. Its poverty rate stands at 9%, slightly higher than the county’s average. The median household income in Dale City is $91,250, approximately 23% lower than the county median.

Dale City boasts greater diversity compared to the other neighborhoods listed, with Hispanic or Latino (34%), white (33%), black or African American (22%), and Asian (7%) as the primary demographic groups.

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5. Neabsco

Neabsco, a CDP in the southwestern part of the county, accommodates a population of 14,900. It faces an 8% poverty rate, slightly above the county average.

The median household income in Neabsco is $92,500, around 22% lower than the county median. Neabsco also demonstrates a fair degree of diversity, with black or African American (40%), Hispanic or Latino (32%), white (19%), and Asian (6%) as the prominent ethnic groups.

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In Conclusion

Prince William County, although known for its affluence and diversity, grapples with pockets of poverty and economic disparity. The five neighborhoods outlined above bear witness to higher poverty rates and lower incomes than the county’s overall statistics. Moreover, they exhibit varying racial and ethnic profiles.

Addressing the challenges faced by these communities, such as limited access to education, healthcare, transportation, and affordable housing, necessitates collaborative efforts from multiple stakeholders, including local government, community organizations, businesses, and residents.

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